Total Pageviews

Wednesday, 14 August 2013

Alfredo Moser: Bottle light inventor proud to be poor

Alfredo Moser's invention is lighting up the world. In 2002, the Brazilian mechanic had a light-bulb moment and came up with a way of illuminating his house during the day without electricity - using nothing more than plastic bottles filled with water and a tiny bit of bleach.


Alfredo in his workshop

In the last two years his innovation has spread throughout the world. It is expected to be in one million homes by early next year.
So how does it work? Simple refraction of sunlight, explains Moser, as he fills an empty two-litre plastic bottle.
"Add two capfuls of bleach to protect the water so it doesn't turn green [with algae]. The cleaner the bottle, the better," he adds.
Wrapping his face in a cloth he makes a hole in a roof tile with a drill. Then, from the bottom upwards, he pushes the bottle into the newly-made hole.
"You fix the bottle in with polyester resin. Even when it rains, the roof never leaks - not one drop."
Moser's lamps - as seen from above
                 The lamps work best with a black cap - a film case can also be used                      

"An engineer came and measured the light," he says. "It depends on how strong the sun is but it's more or less 40 to 60 watts," he says.
The inspiration for the "Moser lamp" came to him during one of the country's frequent electricity blackouts in 2002. "The only places that had energy were the factories - not people's houses," he says, talking about the city where he lives, Uberaba, in southern Brazil.
Moser and his friends began to wonder how they would raise the alarm, in case of an emergency, such as a small plane coming down, imagining a situation in which they had no matches.
His boss at the time suggested getting a discarded plastic bottle, filling it with water and using it as a lens to focus the sun's rays on dry grass. That way one could start a fire, as a signal to rescuers. This idea stuck in Moser's head - he started playing around, filling up bottles and making circles of refracted light.
Soon he had developed the lamp.
"I didn't make any design drawings," he says.
"It's a divine light. God gave the sun to everyone, and light is for everyone. Whoever wants it saves money. You can't get an electric shock from it, and it doesn't cost a penny."
Moser has installed the bottle lamps in neighbours' houses and the local supermarket.
Alfredo Moser with one of his bottle lights
While he does earn a few dollars installing them, it's obvious from his simple house and his 1974 car that his invention hasn't made him wealthy. What it has given him is a great sense of pride.

How much energy do the lamps save?

  • The plastic bottles are up-cycled in the local community, so no energy is needed to gather, shred, manufacture and ship new bottles
  • The carbon footprint of the manufacture of one incandescent bulb is 0.45kg CO2
  • A 50 Watt light bulb running for 14 hours a day for a year has a carbon footprint of nearly 200kg CO2
  • Moser lamps emit no CO2
From BBC News magazine

4 comments :

  1. For most recent information you have to pay a visit world-wide-web and on web I
    found this web site as a best web site for hottest updates.


    Also visit my webpage: pregnancy tests ()

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi my loved one! I wish to say that this article is awesome, great written and include almost all significant infos.
    I would like to look more posts like this .



    my blog ... dating sites (bestdatingsitesnow.com)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Pretty! This was an extremely wonderful article. Thank you for supplying these
    details.

    Here is my webpage :: JackHRiskalla

    ReplyDelete
  4. I was recommended this blog via my cousin.
    I'm not positive whether this put up is written by him as
    nobody else know such precise approximately my difficulty.
    You're incredible! Thank you!

    Stop by my web blog ... CandelariaGMadagan

    ReplyDelete

comentários